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Indian Market

Indian Market

 

This weekend, August 16 to 18 is the 98th annual Indian Market here in Santa Fe. It is the largest and most prestigious juried Native arts show in the world. Over 1,100 Native artists from the U.S. and Canada sell their artwork. The Indian Market attracts 150,000 visitors to Santa Fe from all over the world. Buyers, collectors and gallery owners come to Indian Market to take advantage of the opportunity to buy directly from the artists. For many visitors, this is a rare opportunity to meet the artists and learn about contemporary Indian arts and cultures. Quality and authenticity are the hallmarks of the Santa Fe Indian Market.

The artists are people from over 220 U.S. Federally recognized tribes and First Nations’ Tribes (Canada). To the casual observer, it may not be evident that there may be generations of artists sitting together under the same booth. Some artists have been participating in Indian Market 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and even 60+ years. Their artwork is the universal language, which speaks and becomes a part of our lives.

The Indian Market officially begins on Saturday, 7:00 am -5:00 pm and Sunday 8:00 – 5:00 pm. Saturday is typically when the die-hard collectors come to shop. Sunday morning is less busy and preferred by those Market goers who wish to take their time discovering and rediscovering the hidden gems of Market.

Santa Fe Footprints does not offer walking tours on Saturday and Sunday of Indian Market. Not only is it just too crowded, we believe you should be enjoying the market and not desperately trying to hear what our extremely informative guides are saying. We do have tours the week leading up to and the days following the market. These tours will help you understand what you are about to experience or if after the market, make some sense of what you have been through.

The Santa Fe Trail

The Santa Fe Trail

Wagon Train Arriving in Santa Fe

The Santa Fe Trail was a 19th-century transportation route that connected  Independence, Missouri with Santa Fe , New Mexico. Pioneered in 1821 by William Becknell, the trail served as a vital commercial highway until the introduction of the Railroad to Santa Fe in 1880.

Comanche raiding farther south in Mexico isolated New Mexico. This made it more dependent on the American trade. It also provided the Comanches with a steady supply of horses for sale. By the 1840s, trail traffic along the Arkansas Valley was so heavy that bison herds could not reach important seasonal grazing land. This contributing to their collapse. The loss of the bison hastened the decline of Comanche power in the region.

After the U.S. acquisition of the New Mexico, the trail helped open the region to U.S. economic development and settlement. The trail played a vital role in the expansion of the U.S. into the lands it had acquired.

The story of the Santa Fe trail is one of the numerous features guest will enjoy when taking Santa Fe Footprints  Historic Walking Tour.