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Corn Necklace

Corn Necklace

The corn necklace is made of large dried then dyed corn kernels. These are then strung together to become a rainbow of bright colors. The necklaces are a testament to the importance of corn as a staple for the Southwest Indians. Corn is one of the ‘three sisters’ of sustenance, corn, beans and squash. Of the three, corn reigns supreme and is celebrated in myth, ritual and dance.

The best and most fascinating time to visit one of the pueblos around Santa Fe is during a pueblo feast day. A corn dance is a signature event in many of these feast days celebration.

Attending a pueblo feast day and witnessing a corn dance is a great experience for visitors of all ages. The Nambe’ corn dance held my 6-year-old twin grandsons utterly spellbound.

Your Santa Fe Footprints guide will be able to provide you with information on all the pueblo feast days and dances.

Squash Blossom

Squash Blossom

You’re in Santa Fe and you have heard about the ‘Squash Blossom’. Is it some kind of weird local flower? No. It’s a very distinctive Santa Fe necklace. It is distinguished by a large crescent shaped pendant hanging from a chain of silver beads. The crescent shape has its origins in the Middle East. It is believed to protect the wearer from the ‘evil eye’. Spanish conquistadors brought this style to New Mexico. Navajo silversmiths, under the influence of New Mexican jewelries, evolved to create their own unique style. The fluted beads of the chain are made to resemble the native squash blooms.

Originally made purely of silver, now turquoise has become an integral part of the squash blossom.

The squash blossom is just one of many spectacular pieces of jewelry made by local artist to be found in Santa Fe. Your Santa Fe Footprints guide will inform you of the history of Santa Fe art and as a bonus point you in the right direction for the best deals and most authentic pieces.

Bolo Ties

Bolo Ties

The neck tie may be suffering a decline due to casual Fridays and Silicon Valley chic but out here in the west the Bolo ties is still the mark of a well-dressed man. Bolo tie? What’s that? The Bolo Tie is simplicity itself. A leather cord, usually braided, and held together with some sort of sliding clasp. Sounds simple doesn’t it? Ah, but here is where simplicity ends and fashion, art and craftsmanship take over.

The leather cords are not just any leather. The cord tips can be an endless variety of shapes made of silver aglets of the highest craftsmanship. The clasp is where the Bolo Tie really shines. Silversmiths, Native, Hispanic and Anglo, craft elaborate clasp made of the finest silver. A feature of a clasp can be a remarkable turquoise stone.

Bolos are not just for men! The ladies find them to be an excellent fashion addition that works with a gown for the opera or jeans for the BBQ. Your Santa Fe Footprints guide can point you to the best places to find the real thing at the best prices.